IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Cross-Layer Data Aggregation in a Cognitive Radio Wireless Mesh Sensor Network

Presented by: Professor Chen-Khong Tham, National University of Singapore

Abstract: Backbone networks, such as wireless mesh networks, provide a more suitable topology for data aggregation compared to a flat topology. Nonetheless, the performance of a mesh topology may be adversely affected if the spectrum is overcrowded. Incorporating cognition can help relieve the issues caused by the scarcity of transmission opportunities by leveraging on dynamic spectrum access. Hence, a suitable data aggregation architecture for cognitive radio wireless mesh sensor networks (CR-WMSN) is required. In this talk, a framework for data aggregation in a CR-WMSN will be presented. We address the energy, transmission latency and data accuracy trade-offs by proposing a cross-layer optimization framework that controls the power, link access, routing and rate parameters such that the optimum balance between network lifetime and other quality of information (QoI) and quality of service (QoS) metrics are obtained. Our simulation and comparative results show that network lifetime and data accuracy can be controlled by adjusting the cross-layer parameters, and that the proposed cross layer scheme outperforms existing data aggregation schemes.

Biography: Chen-Khong Tham is an Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) of the National University of Singapore (NUS). His current research focuses on sensor network infrastructures and real-time sensor data analytics involving cyber-physical systems, wireless sensor networks, mobile cloud computing and participatory sensing. He obtained his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in Electrical and Information Sciences Engineering from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. From 2007-10, he was on secondment at the A*STAR Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R) Singapore. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Internet of Things Journal (IoT-J) and is in the editorial board of the International Journal of Network Management, and was the general chair of the IEEE SECON 2014, IEEE AINA 2011 and IEEE APSCC 2009 conferences. He is a member of the Technical Standards Advisory Committee (TSAC) convened by the Infocomm Development Authority (iDA) of Singapore.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Cross-Layer Data Aggregation in a Cognitive Radio Wireless Mesh Sensor Network

Presented by: Professor Chen-Khong Tham, National University of Singapore

Abstract:  Backbone networks, such as wireless mesh networks, provide a more suitable topology for data aggregation compared to a flat topology. Nonetheless, the performance of a mesh topology may be adversely affected if the spectrum is overcrowded. Incorporating cognition can help relieve the issues caused by the scarcity of transmission opportunities by leveraging on dynamic spectrum access. Hence, a suitable data aggregation architecture for cognitive radio wireless mesh sensor networks (CR-WMSN) is required. In this talk, a framework for data aggregation in a CR-WMSN will be presented. We address the energy, transmission latency and data accuracy trade-offs by proposing a cross-layer optimization framework that controls the power, link access, routing and rate parameters such that the optimum balance between network lifetime and other quality of information (QoI) and quality of service (QoS) metrics are obtained. Our simulation and comparative results show that network lifetime and data accuracy can be controlled by adjusting the cross-layer parameters, and that the proposed cross layer scheme outperforms existing data aggregation schemes.

Biography:  Chen-Khong Tham is an Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) of the National University of Singapore (NUS). His current research focuses on sensor network infrastructures and real-time sensor data analytics involving cyber-physical systems, wireless sensor networks, mobile cloud computing and participatory sensing. He obtained his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in Electrical and Information Sciences Engineering from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. From 2007-10, he was on secondment at the A*STAR Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R) Singapore. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Internet of Things Journal (IoT-J) and is in the editorial board of the International Journal of Network Management, and was the general chair of the IEEE SECON 2014, IEEE AINA 2011 and IEEE APSCC 2009 conferences. He is a member of the Technical Standards Advisory Committee (TSAC) convened by the Infocomm Development Authority (iDA) of Singapore.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Mobility for Tomorrow – A Large Scale Smart Mobility Test Bed @ Nanyang Technological University

Presented by: Dr. Ming Yang, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Abstract: In this presentation, Dr. Yang will introduce an ITS V2X communication program, Smart Mobility Test Bed, that is developed in Nanyang Technological University (NTU) campus. After a brief talk about the four program directions, namely, Research, Use Case, Industry Collaboration and Test Bed, Dr. Yang will emphasize on the end-to-end system design, development and deployment of the Test Bed. Each component of the Test Bed, like outdoor network infrastructure, video surveillance system, data centre, control centre and vehicular setup will be presented in details. At the end of the presentation, Dr. Yang will bring up the practical ‘scalability’ issue for large scale live platform. Some solutions that has been implemented in this Test Bed project will be discussed.  This Smart Mobility Test Bed program is a four-year collaboration program between NTU and NXP and is largely funded by Singapore Economic Development Board.

Biography:
Dr. Yang Ming received his Ph.D degree from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, in 2006. From 2008, he worked with Alcatel-Lucent as a technical project manager, delivering the Microsoft MediaRoom (bought over by Ericsson as Ericsson MediaRoom in 2013) IPTV solution to Singtel, Singapore. From 2011, he joined Harmonic Inc. as a project manager, managing all live projects of the key video delivery accounts over South APAC region. Currently, he is working as the project manager for the Smart Mobility Test Bed program, funded by Singapore Economic Development Board, in Nanyang Technological University.  He leads the system design and deployment of Data Centre and Control Centre.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Active Target Localization via Adaptive, Sparse Sampling

Presented by: Professor Urbashi Mitra, University of Southern California

Abstract: Consider a field of interest from which you can only collect a few observations.  From these observations, we wish to detect whether a target exists and its location. Such a problem arises in military surveillance, environmental monitoring, cyber-security, medical diagnosis, epidemic detection. In this talk we consider a novel approach to target detection from sparse samples.  In particular, we model the target of interest as one emitting  a signature that has spatial extent across the field (versus being a single pixel); furthermore this signature is spatially separable and decays as a function of the distance of the observation point from the target.  The  target detection and localization algorithm employs highly incomplete and noisy samples.  For example, one can imagine a vehicle, autonomously traversing over the field to collect these samples and actively determining the next sample to collect. The novelty of this work is the use of separability and bilinearity to achieve a multi-dimensional trade-off in sample complexity, navigational complexity and detection/localization error, subject to computational tractability. We use methods from matrix completion to solve the localization problem. We note that the assumptions on the field are fairly generic and are applicable to many decay profiles; furthermore, our approach does not need exact knowledge of the target signature. Our analysis of the algorithm makes use of tools from concentration of measure in high-dimensional geometry and optimization theory with emphasis on low-rank matrix recovery.  We are able to provide characterizations of the localization performance as a function of sample complexity and features of the underlying signature.  The method is compared to gradient search methods and provides strong improvements and robustness to noise.

Biography:  Urbashi Mitra received the B.S. and the M.S. degrees from the University of California at Berkeley and her Ph.D. from Princeton University. After a six-year stint at the Ohio State University, she joined the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, where she is currently a Professor. Dr. Mitra is a member of the IEEE Information Theory Society’s Board of Governors (2002-2007, 2012-2017) and the IEEE Signal Processing Society’s Technical Committee on Signal Processing for Communications and Networks (2012-2016). Dr. Mitra is a Fellow of the IEEE.  She is the inaugural Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Molecular, Biological and Multi-scale Communications. Dr. Mitra is the recipient of: 2014-2015 IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer, 2012 Globecom Signal Processing for Communications Symposium Best Paper Award, 2012 NAE Lillian Gilbreth Lectureship, USC Center for Excellence in Research Fellowship (2010-2013), the 2009 DCOSS Applications & Systems Best Paper Award, Texas Instruments Visiting Professor (Fall 2002, Rice University), 2001 Okawa Foundation Award, 2000 OSU College of Engineering Lumley Award for Research, 1997 OSU College of Engineering MacQuigg Award for Teaching, and a 1996 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award. Dr. Mitra currently serves on the IEEE Fourier Award for Signal Processing, the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal and the IEEE Paper Prize committees. She has been an Associate Editor for the following IEEE publications: Transactions on Signal Processing (2012-2015), Transactions on Information Theory (2007-2011), Journal of Oceanic Engineering (2006-2011), and Transactions on Communications (1996-2001). She has co-chaired: (technical program) 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory in Honolulu, HI, 2014 IEEE Information Theory Workshop in Hobart, Tasmania, IEEE 2012 International Conference on Signal Processing and Communications, Bangalore India, and  the IEEE  Communication Theory Symposium at ICC 2003 in Anchorage, AK;  and  general co-chair for the first ACM Workshop on Underwater Networks at Mobicom 2006, Los Angeles, CA Dr. Mitra was the Tutorials Chair for IEEE ISIT 2007 in Nice, France and the Finance Chair for IEEE ICASSP 2008 in Las Vegas, NV.  She served as co-Director of the Communication Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California from 2004-2007.  Her research interests are in: wireless communications, biological communication, underwater acoustic communications, communication and sensor networks, detection and estimation and the interface of communication, sensing and control.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: A New Transmission Technique:  OFDM with Index Modulation

Presented by:
Professor Erdal Panayirci, Kadir Has University, Istanbul, Turkey

Abstract: In this presentation, a novel orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) scheme, which is called OFDM with index modulation (OFDM-IM), is proposed for frequency-selective fading and fast timer-varying channels. In this scheme, inspiring from the recently introduced spatial modulation concept for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channels, the information is conveyed not only by M-ary signal constellations as in classical OFDM, but also by the indices of the subcarriers, which are activated according to the incoming bit stream. Different transceiver structures are proposed and a theoretical error performance analysis is provided for the new scheme. It is shown via computer simulations that the proposed scheme achieves significantly better error performance than classical OFDM due to fact that less ICI is generated in high mobility channels and that the information bits are carried in the spatial domain by the indices of OFDM subcarriers.

Biography: Erdal Panayirci received the MS degree in Electrical Engineering from Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and System Science from Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan, USA.  Currently he is the Department Head of the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department at Kadir Has University, Istanbul, Turkey.  He spent 2008-2009 academic year in Princeton University as a Visiting Research Fellow.  His research interests include communication theory, synchronization, channel estimation and equalization, multicarrier systems, coded modulation and interference cancellation with array processing and space-time coded and MIMO systems. He published extensively in the leading scientific journals and the international conferences. He has co-authored the book Principles of Integrated Maritime Surveillance Systems (Boston, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000).  He is the director of the Network of Excellence in Wireless Communications (NEWCOM), representing Kadir Has University, established recently by the European Commission on the Seventh Frame Program which focuses on activities in Wireless Communications research, technological development and demonstration. Prof. Panayırcı is a Fulbright-Hays Fellow, NATO Scientist Fellow and an IEEE Life Fellow. He is Member of Sigma Xi.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Connected Vehicle Technologies: Communication System Analyses and Green-Driving Strategies

Presented by:
Professor Wenlong Jin, University of California, Irvine

Abstract: Connected vehicle technologies can transform the transportation sector, improving the safety, mobility, and environmental impacts. My collaborators and I have focused on some theoretical issues related to the fundamentals and applications. This talk is divided into two parts. In the first part, I will discuss basic characteristics of connected vehicle systems, also known as vehicular ad hoc networks, built on the dedicated short range communications. In particular, I will present mathematical models for estimating instantaneous connectivity and communication throughputs under general vehicular traffic patterns. In the second part, I will discuss applications of connected vehicle technologies in the development of green-driving strategies. For freeway stop-and-go traffic, I will present a distributed cooperative strategy based on vehicle-to-vehicle communications and the simulation and field test results. For arterial traffic, I will present a feedback control strategy based on infrastructure (signal)-to-vehicle communications. To conclude, I will present some related efforts within our group.

Biography: Dr. Wenlong Jin (BS in Automatic Control, University of Science and Technology of China, 1998; PhD in Applied Mathematics, UC Davis, 2003) is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Irvine. He is interested in developing fundamental and systematic concepts and methods for modeling, analyzing, monitoring, and controlling transportation systems, through interdisciplinary approaches based on behavioral modeling, mathematical analysis, systems theory, and information and communication technologies. He has been a principal or co-principal investigator of over twenty federally- and state-sponsored projects. Dr. Jin has co-authored 42 peer-reviewed journal articles, most of which were published by Transportation Research, Transportation Science, and other top journals, 37 conference proceedings, and five reports, and has given over 40 invited talks and conference presentations. He is an editorial board member of Transportation Research Part B and an Associate Editor of Transportmetrica B.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Recent Advances in Spatial Modulation

Presented by:
Professor Hikmet Sari, SUPELEC, France

Abstract: Spatial modulation (SM) is a MIMO technique, which was introduced for wireless systems in which the number of RF chains is smaller than the number of transmit antennas. The principle is to convey information bits using the index(es) of the active antenna(s). In this talk, we review conventional SM and present a newly introduced technique using one or two active antennas and multiple signal constellations. This technique, which we refer to as Enhanced SM or ESM, conveys information bits not only by the index(es) of the active antenna(s), but also by the constellations transmitted from each of them. The main feature of Enhanced SM is that it uses a primary signal constellation during the single active antenna periods and some other secondary constellations during the periods with two active transmit antennas. The secondary signal constellations are derived from the primary constellation by means of geometric interpolation in the signal space. We give design examples using two and four transmit antennas and QPSK, 16QAM and 64QAM as primary modulations. The proposed technique is compared to conventional SM as well as to spatial multiplexing (SMX), and the results indicate that in most cases, ESM provides a substantial performance gain over conventional SM and SMX, while reducing the maximum-likelihood (ML) decoder complexity.

Biography: Hikmet Sari is a Professor and Head of the Telecommunications Department at SUPELEC, France, and Chief Scientist of Sequans Communications. Previously, he held research and management positions at Philips, SAT, Alcatel, Pacific Broadband Communications, and Juniper Networks. He received his Engineering Diploma and Ph.D. from the ENST, Paris, France, and the Habilitation degree from the University of Paris-Sud, Orsay.

Dr. Sari has served as an Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Communications, Guest Editor of the European Transactions on Telecommunications, Guest Editor of IEEE JSAC, Associate Editor of the IEEE Communications Letters, Chair of the Communication Theory Symposium of ICC 2002, Technical Program Chair of ICC 2004, Vice General Chair of ICC 2006, General Chair of PIMRC 2010, General Chair of WCNC 2012, Executive Chair of WCNC 2014, Chair of the GITC in 2010 – 2011, Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Communications Society (2001 – 2006), Member of the IEEE Fellow Evaluation Committee (2002 – 2007), and Member of the Awards Committee (2005 – 2007) of this society. He is currently serving as Executive Vice-Chair of ICC 2016, Executive Chair of ICC 2017, and Vice-President – Conferences of the IEEE Communications Society.

His distinctions include the IEEE Fellow Grade and the Andre Blondel Medal in 1995, the Edwin H. Armstrong Award in 2003, the Harold Sobol Award in 2012, and election to the European Academy and to the Science Academy of Turkey in 2012.

IEEE ComSoc Distinguished Lecture

Title: 5G Evolution and Candidate Technologies

Presented by: Dr. Rath Vannithamby, Intel Labs

Abstract: As 4G standards have completed and networks are beginning to be deployed, the attention of the mobile research community is shifting towards what will be the next set of innovations in wireless communication technologies.  Given a historical 10-year cycle for every generation of cellular advancement, it is expected that networks with 5G technologies will be deployed around 2020. Technologies for future cellular wireless networks and devices are expected to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse set of devices and services in 5G. In this presentation, I will discuss the usages and technologies that will comprise the next set of cellular advancements in 5G.  In particular, I will discuss a) the applications and usages for future 5G communications, b) a set of key metrics for these usages and their corresponding target requirements, and c) the potential network architectures and enabling technologies to meet 5G requirements. It is expected that some of the new technologies comprising 5G will be evolutionary, covering gaps and enhancements from 4G systems, while some other technologies will be disruptive.  These technologies will encompass the end-to-end wireless system: from wireless network infrastructure to spectrum availability to device innovations. I will also provide an overview of 5G activities around the world to understand the vision and research direction of various teams as they tackle the challenging problems of capacity, massive number of IoT devices, ultra-low latency, ultra-low power efficiency, etc. that wireless networks are expected to face beyond 2020.

Biography:
Rath Vannithamby received his BS, MS, and PhD degrees in EE from the University of Toronto. He leads a team responsible for 5G and Internet of Things research in Intel Labs. Previously, he was a researcher at Ericsson. He is a Senior Member of IEEE. He is an IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer. He has published over 50 journal/conference papers and has over 150 patents granted/pending. He is a co-editor of a couple of books “Towards 5G: Applications, Requirements and Candidate Technologies” by Wiley and “Design and Deployment of Small Cell Networks” by Cambridge Press, in production. He has also authored chapters of 3 books. Dr. Vannithamby has given keynote speeches in IEEE APWiMob’14, IEEE ISTT’14, and IEEE GC’10 Broadband Wireless Access workshop. He is currently an associate editor for two journals: (i) Journal of IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, and (ii) IEEE Internet of Things Journal. He was a lead-chair for workshops on (i) “5G Technologies” and (ii) “M2M Communications for IoT” in IEEE ICC 2014. He is a co-chair for Industry Forum and Exhibits in IEEE GC’15. He was a Guest Editor for EURASIP JWCN SI on RRM for 3G+ Systems. He was a TPC track-chair for PIMRC’11. He has also served on TPC for IEEE ICC, GC, VTC, WCNC, and PIMRC. His research interests are in the area of 5G, M2M Communications for IoT, energy efficiency, low-latency, QoS for mobile internet applications, cross-layer techniques.