IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Distinguished Lecture

IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Distinguished Lecture

Title: Wireless Systems Evolution Beyond 4G: An Infrastructure and Spectrum Framework

Presented by: Professor Elvino Sousa, University of Toronto

 

Abstract: This talk will discuss some of the trends in current wireless research in the area of public wireless, or cellular systems. There are various initiatives throughout the world in broadband wireless systems research. A lot of this research is being described in the customary manner as 5G, although we make the point that in terms of a standard the evolution beyond 4G may not be over a single path. The talk will present new ways of looking at cellular systems emphasizing the role of infrastructure and spectrum in a unified framework. We discuss various approaches to the evolution of cellular systems beyond the current 4G and their prospects in terms of meeting the ultimate goals of providing coverage, capacity, flexibility, and robust deployment. We discuss approaches that we refer two as two-tier cellular systems including aspects of network MIMO, relays, organic deployment, spectrum management, multi-RAT, multi-mode, and multi-operator scenarios. In terms of spectrum we discussion the current interest in the design of systems that jointly utilize licensed and unlicensed spectrum.

Biography:  Elvino S. Sousa received his B.A.Sc. in engineering science, and the M.A.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Toronto in 1980 and 1982 respectively, and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California in 1985. Since 1986 he has been with the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto where he is now a Professor and the Jeffrey Skoll Professor in Computer Network Architecture. His current interests are in the areas of autonomous infrastructure wireless networks, cognitive radio, self configurable wireless networks, and two-tier networks. He pioneered the area of wireless communications at the University of Toronto and is the director of the wireless lab, which has undertaken research in wireless systems for the past 28 years. He is the inventor of the autonomous infrastructure wireless network concept. He has been invited to give numerous lectures and short courses on spread spectrum, CDMA, and wireless systems in many countries, and has been a consultant to industry and Governments internationally in the area of wireless systems. He was the technical program chair for PIMRC 95, vice-technical program chair for Globecom ’99, Co-Technical Program Chair for WPMC 2010 and for PIMRC 2011, and has been involved in the technical program committee of numerous international conferences. He has also been involved in various standardization and industry related wireless activities and currently is actively participating in NGMN as an advisor. He is a past chair of the IEEE Technical committee on Personal Communications and has been elected IEEE Fellow. He has spent sabbatical leaves at Qualcomm and Sony CSL/ATL. He has been awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal.

IEEE VTS Distinguished Lecture

Title: Wireless Systems Evolution Beyond 4G:  An Infrastructure and Spectrum Framework

Presented by: Professor Elvino Sousa, University of Toronto

Abstract: This talk will discuss some of the trends in current wireless research in the area of public wireless, or cellular systems. There are various initiatives throughout the world in broadband wireless systems research.  A lot of this research is being described in the customary manner as 5G, although we make the point that in terms of a standard the evolution beyond 4G may not be over a single path. The talk will present new ways of looking at cellular systems emphasizing the role of infrastructure and spectrum in a unified framework.  We discuss various approaches to the evolution of cellular systems beyond the current 4G and their prospects in terms of meeting the ultimate goals of providing coverage, capacity, flexibility, and robust deployment. We discuss approaches that we refer two as two-tier cellular systems including aspects of network MIMO, relays, organic deployment, spectrum management, multi-RAT, multi-mode, and multi-operator scenarios. In terms of spectrum we discussion the current interest in the design of systems that jointly utilize licensed and unlicensed spectrum.

Biography: Elvino S. Sousa received his B.A.Sc. in engineering science, and the M.A.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Toronto in 1980 and 1982 respectively, and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California in 1985. Since 1986 he has been with the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto where he is now a Professor and the Jeffrey Skoll Professor in Computer Network Architecture. His current interests are in the areas of autonomous infrastructure wireless networks, cognitive radio, self configurable wireless networks, and two-tier networks. He pioneered the area of wireless communications at the University of Toronto and is the director of the wireless lab, which has undertaken research in wireless systems for the past 28 years. He is the inventor of the autonomous infrastructure wireless network concept. He has been invited to give numerous lectures and short courses on spread spectrum, CDMA, and wireless systems in many countries, and has been a consultant to industry and Governments internationally in the area of wireless systems.  He was the technical program chair for PIMRC 95, vice-technical program chair for Globecom ’99, Co-Technical Program Chair for WPMC 2010 and for PIMRC 2011, and has been involved in the technical program committee of numerous international conferences.  He has also been involved in various standardization and industry related wireless activities and currently is actively participating in NGMN as an advisor.  He is a past chair of the IEEE Technical committee on Personal Communications and has been elected IEEE Fellow. He has spent sabbatical leaves at Qualcomm and Sony CSL/ATL. He has been awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal.

IEEE Vancouver Joint Communications Chapter Seminar

Title: Your first wireless product:  Essential things you need to know

Presented by: Lee Vishloff, Wireless Consultant

Abstract:   That all-in-one radio IC data sheet says “No RF experience required”. But is it true? There are a host of things that one needs to understand when designing a wireless product. The most important of these is making (or keeping) the product legal to sell. Then comes performance. Poor wireless performance results in product support calls which will destroy profit margin and/or create many unhappy customers. In these days of high competition and social media poorly performing products are a sure way to a quick product death.

What is covered: This seminar will cover the essential things you need to address in order to create a high quality wireless product including:
1. Radio transmission basics
2. Selecting a wireless platform
3. Module cautions
4. Regulatory requirements
5. Destroying radio performance
6. Making your product testable

Who should attend: This seminar is relevant to:
• Designers new to wireless product development
• R&D team leaders and managers
• Product managers looking to add wireless capability to a product line
• Investors and budget managers in a company starting in wireless

Answer to question: Yes, if you don’t care about transmit power, receive performance and regulatory approval.

Biography:   Mr. Vishloff is the principal engineer in a wireless consultancy working in the areas of cellular-based M2M solutions, short-range wireless products and EMC Consulting. He is a regular contributor to the IEEE Communications Society training program teaching several courses in Wireless Technology. He has over 30 years of experience in wireless systems and product design. During his career he has designed a wide range of wireless products including satellite systems, terrestrial radio systems, short-range video, rural communications, aeronautical and others. Lee brings a wide range of practical experience with hands-on and management experience in wireless telecommunication systems, modem, RF, analog, digital, embedded firmware and mechanical design technologies. He has spent the majority of his career working with equipment manufacturers with stints in the semiconductor and consulting businesses. Lee has a degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of British Columbia and completed his management education at Simon Fraser University and the AEA/Stanford Executive Institute. He is a Professional Engineer, Senior Member of the IEEE and an IEEE Certified Wireless Communication Professional. He is also the Treasurer of the IEEE Vancouver Section.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Information Systems and Science for Energy

Presented by:
Professor S. Keshav, University of Waterloo

Abstract: Traditional energy systems are centralized and carbon-intensive, with minimal energy storage, infrequent monitoring, and inefficient models of consumption. In contrast, future energy systems will incorporate tens of millions of stochastic renewable-energy sources and vastly more storage. Unlike the consumers of today–information poor, control poor, and energy rich–driven by the availability of pervasive communication, control, measurement, and computation, future consumers will be information rich, control rich, and energy frugal. Moreover, future energy systems are likely to have an architecture that resembles the Internet, i.e., large-scale, loosely-coupled, distributed, and heterogeneous. My research hypothesis, therefore, is that technologies and concepts originally developed for the Internet will play a key role in future energy systems. Given this overall motivation, the focus of my research group is on three disruptive technologies: pervasive sensing storage, and distributed renewable energy sources, especially solar energy. We have studied these elements in the context of electric vehicles, smart homes and buildings, and in the distribution network. In this talk, I will touch on some examples of our work and discuss some open problems in energy systems.

Biography: S. Keshav received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991. He was subsequently a researcher at AT&T Bell Laboratories and an Associate Professor at Cornell University. In 1999 he left academia to co-found Ensim Corporation and GreenBorder Technologies Inc.. He was an Associate Professor at the University of Waterloo from 2003 to 2008 and has been a Professor since, holding a Canada Research Chair (2004-14) and the Cisco Chair in Smart Grid (2012-17). He is the author of two graduate textbooks on computer networking, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, an ACM Fellow, and Chair of ACM SIGCOMM.  http://blizzard.cs.uwaterloo.ca/keshav/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Photonics for Microwave Systems and Ultra-Wideband Signal Processing

Presented by:
Professor Willie W. Ng, Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

Abstract: This seminar will describe the development and utilization of photonics technology in microwave antenna systems and ultra-wideband signal processing.  It will cover our recent work on photonic assisted analog-to-digital conversion, the characterization of jitter in mode-locked lasers, frequency-locked photonic oscillators, and the use of Si microdisk heterogeneously integrated with silica waveguides for RF-photonic filtering.  It will also describe how the broadband capabilities of photonics and wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) technologies can be exploited for high dynamic range antenna remoting and true-time-delay beamforming that cover multiple microwave bands.

Biography: Dr. Willie W. Ng is currently a Research Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC).  Prior to joining USC in 2013, he spent close to three decades at HRL Laboratories, Malibu, CA, where he was a Principal Research Scientist, Program Manager and Department Manager.  Under DARPA and U.S. Air Force sponsorships, he led HRL teams that demonstrated a variety of photonic devices/subsystems designed for microwave antenna systems and ultra-wideband signal processing, including RF-photonic filtering and photonics-assisted analog-to-digital conversion.  He has given many invited talks in IEEE/OSA Conferences and DARPA Symposiums, and is the author and co-author of over 100 journal articles and conference papers.  He holds 25 U.S. patents in the area of photonics technology, with many pending. Cited for pioneering contributions to microwave photonics, he was one of six individuals selected to receive the Excellence in Technology Award in 2005 from the Raytheon Company.  Prior to HRL, he was a Member of the Technical Staff at the Rockwell Science Center, Thousand Oaks, Calif., where he developed GaInAsP/InP buried heterostructure lasers and power converters.  He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio), and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, Calif.) under the guidance of Prof. A. Yariv.  His thesis work was on the demonstration of GaAlAs/GaAs Distributed Bragg Reflector lasers and Bragg waveguides.  He is a fellow of the IEEE, and serves on the 2013-2015 CLEO (Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics) Technical Committee.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Channel Estimation for OFDM Systems over Doubly Selective Channels: A Distributed Compressive Sensing Based Approach

Presented by: Dr. Peng Cheng, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia

Abstract: Compressive sensing is an exciting, rapidly growing field which has attracted considerable attention in electrical engineering, applied mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Compressive sensing offers a framework for simultaneous sensing and compression of finite-dimensional vectors, which relies on linear dimensionality reduction. Interestingly, it predicts that sparse high-dimensional signals can be recovered from highly incomplete vectors. This can potentially revolutionize many applications such as radar, microscopy, and wireless communication by making efficient use of the available degrees of freedom in these settings.  In wireless communication scenario, channel estimation for an orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) broadband system over a doubly selective channel is very challenging. This is mainly due to the significant Doppler shift, which results in a time-frequency doubly-selective (DS) channel. The DS channel features a large number of channel coefficients, which introduces inter-carrier interference (ICI) and forces the need for allocating a large number of pilot subcarriers. To tackle this problem, we propose a novel channel estimation scheme based on distributed compressive sensing (DCS) theory. Taking advantage of the basis expansion model (BEM) and the channel sparsity in the delay domain, we transform the original DS channel into a novel two-dimensional channel model, where several jointly sparse BEM coefficient vectors become the estimation goal. Then a special decoupling form originating from a novel sparse pilot pattern is designed for such estimation, which results in an ICI-free structure and enables the DCS application to make joint estimation of these vectors accurately. Combined with a smoothing treatment process, the proposed scheme can achieve significantly higher estimation accuracy than the existing ones, although with a much smaller number of pilot subcarriers. Theoretical analysis and simulation results both confirm its performance merits.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: 900 MHz Wide Area (~ 5 km) Wireless Sensor Networks Research and Development

Presented by: Professor Shuzo Kato, RIEC Tohoku University, Japan

Abstract: This seminar will present recent research results on 900 MHz wide area sensor networks. The wide area sensor network is intended to cover 5-10 km radius for various applications such as infrastructure monitoring (bridges, tunnels, roads and so on), agriculture, fishery and many others. DSSS (Direct sequence spread spectrum) is adopted with adaptive spreading factors (16 ~32,768) and directive antennas for base stations based on a TDMA –DSSS access scheme. The presentation includes propagation measurements in rural, sub-urban and urban areas, directive BS antenna performance and measurement results, TRX designed and performance. Moreover, interference analysis among different systems in ISM bands will be presented showing the proposed system with directive BS antenna together with DSSS technology achieves higher spectrum usage efficiency in interference dominated ISM bands. The proposed system is a good candidate for wide area sensor networks with high spectrum efficiency.

Biography: Shuzo Kato received his Ph. D degree in electrical and communications engineering from Tohoku University, Sendai Japan in 1977. From 1977 to 1995, he worked at NTT (Nippon Telegraph and Telephone) Research Laboratories in Japan, specializing personal and satellite communications systems R&D. He and his team have developed 39 kinds of ASICs so far without re-spins including the world first TDMA chip set in 1986, the world fastest Viterbi decoder chips in 1987 and 1993, lowest power consumption ADPCM codec (0.5 mW) in 1994, best receiver sensitivity (6 dB improvement) and the world first 2 V operating CMOS SOC PHS baseband chip and many others.  He founded Pacific Communications Research Corp. in 1995 and served as President of Uniden Corporation in 1997. From January 1998 to July 2001, he served as Executive Vice President, Mitsubishi Wireless Communications Inc (MWCI) in USA. From 2002 to 2005, he served as Executive Vice President of Teradyne Japan responsible for P/L, Engineering, Production and Global Marketing as well as President and CEO of Omni Wireless Inc., in USA.  From 2006 to 2010, he served as Program Director / Coordinator, Ubiquitous Mobile Communications at NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) working on wireless communications systems R&D focusing on millimeter wave communications systems. He served as Vice-chair of IEEE802.15.3c Task Group working on millimeter wave systems standardization and Chair of COMPA (Consortium of Millimeter Wave Systems Practical Applications) promoting millimeter wave systems globally and contributed to establish IEEE802.15.3c Standard on multi-Gigabit/s millimeter wave systems in IEEE. He currently is Professor, Research Institute of Electrical Communications, Tohoku University, Japan focusing on wide area wireless sensor networks and 60 GHz communications systems. He has published over 200 technical papers, held over 100 patents (including a patent which became DOD (Department of Defense, USA) standard in 1998), co-founded International Symposium on Personal Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC). He is a Fellow of the IEEE and IEICE Japan and served as an Editor of IEEE Transaction on Communications, Chairman of Satellite and Space Communications Committee, COMSOC IEEE, a Board Member of IEICE Japan.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Chasing Channels – Adaptive Codebooks for Limited Feedback MIMO

Presented by: Professor Pawel A. Dmochowski, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Abstract:  Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems have received considerable attention over the last two decades owing to the improvements in link throughput and/or the reliability of signal reception. In order to achieve the full capacity gains, channel state information is required at the transmitter, thus necessitating feedback of this information from the receiver to the base station. Given the multi-carrier nature of 4G systems, this feedback overhead is restricted to a few bits per subcarrier. Consequently, the performance of limited feedback closed-loop MIMO systems is very sensitive to the codebooks used to achieve such channel quantization. Codebooks in current standards, such as LTE, were optimized for iid Rayleigh fading channels, whereas realistic propagation environments exhibit both temporal and spatial channel correlations. In this talk we will demonstrate the inefficiency and performance loss of standard codebooks in realistic channel models (such as WINNER II), thus motivating adaptive codebook techniques. We will present methods for perturbing the standard codebooks, specifically focusing them around the channel and following the channel trajectory throughout transmission – thus significantly reducing the quantization errors. Blind adaptation methods, i.e. without introducing additional feedback requirements, will be presented.

Biography:  Pawel A. Dmochowski (S’02, M’07, SM’11) was born in Gdansk, Poland. He received a BASc (Engineering Physics) from the University of British Columbia in 1998, and MSc and PhD degrees from Queen’s University at Kingston in 2001 and 2006, respectively. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the School of Engineering and Computer Science at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Prior to joining Victoria University of Wellington, he was a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Visiting Fellow at the Communications Research Centre Canada as well as a Sessional Instructor at Carleton University in Ottawa. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and is actively involved in the IEEE New Zealand Central Section Committee. His research interests include Cognitive Radio, limited feedback and Massive MIMO systems.  Homepage: http://homepages.ecs.vuw.ac.nz/~dmochopa/

Joint IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Assessing Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Wireless Power Transmission Systems

Presented by: Mark Douglas, Foundation for Research on Information Technology in Society, Zurich, Switzerland

Date and time:
Monday, July 28, 2014 at 3 pm

Abstract: Electromagnetic wireless power systems (WPS) have undergone significant technological innovations in the recent years. Inductive coupling has become a popular alternative to wired power, particularly for implantable medical devices and household appliances. The application of WPS to electric vehicles is the focus of recent research work. Traditional direct inductive coupling systems operate over distances within a few millimeters. A second type of WPS transfers power over several centimeters to meters using adaptive and tightly coupled resonant coils to achieve high efficiency. The strong reactive near-field of WPS induces electric fields in the body tissue of persons in their close vicinity. This may pose potential direct health hazards or indirect risks via interference with medical implants. In this presentation, the safety guidelines and the fundamental coupling mechanisms of the human body with the electromagnetic near-fields of WPS are reviewed as well as the methodology and the instrumentation for the demonstration of the safety of such systems operating between 100 kHz and 50 MHz. Based on this review, the advantages and shortcomings of state-of-the-art numerical and experimental techniques are discussed and applied to a generic WPS operating at 8 MHz. Finally, current research needs are identified which include 1) the extension of safety guidelines for coverage of persons with implants, 2) more computationally-efficient full-wave solvers, 3) higher quality human models which cover different population groups and include improved models of nerve tissue, 4) experimental dosimetric methods for the WPS frequency range, and 5) product standards to demonstrate safety of specific WPS.

Biography: Mark Douglas received the B.Eng degree from the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada in 1990, the M.Sc. degree from the University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada in 1993, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Victoria in 1998, all in electrical engineering. His research work in electromagnetic dosimetry has resulted in 5 patents and over 80 papers for scientific conferences and peer-reviewed journals. He serves as the co-chair of IEEE International Committee for Electromagnetic Safety (ICES) Technical Committee 34 and the co-chair of ICES Technical Committee 95 Subcommittee 1. Since 2009, Dr. Douglas has been a Project Leader at the Foundation for Research on Information Technology in Society in Zurich, Switzerland. His work includes the development of instrumentation and procedures to assess exposure from electromagnetic sources. These sources include mobile phones, wireless power transmitters, induction cooking stoves, electric motors and industrial induction heaters. From 2002 to 2009, Dr. Douglas was an engineering manager in the Corporate Electromagnetic Energy Research Laboratory at Motorola in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, where he led advancements in radiofrequency dosimetry research and testing. Before joining Motorola, he was a Senior Technical Leader with the Antenna Development Group at Ericsson in Raleigh, North Carolina, and a member of the Ericsson EMF Research Group in Stockholm, Sweden.

IEEE / UBC ECE Communications Seminar

Title: Communication Solutions in Confined Spaces

Presented by: Professor Xavier Fernando, Ryerson University, Canada

Abstract: Surprisingly large number of people spend time in (underground/underwater) confined spaces such as tunnels and mines. Just Beijing subway carries 3.2 billion riders/year. Over 420,000 people across Canada work in the mining industries. Usually these spaces are disconnected from the outside world. Providing relaible communication services to these confined spaces not only increase the productivity and generate revenue, but it is crtical to avoid fatal disasters. In the harsh environment and changing topology of mines and tunnels, reliable communication is a high-stakes issue. Regular, above-the-ground techniques can’t be directly applied. Transmitting radio signals over optical fibre is an excellent way to bring connectivity. This technology, called ROF for short, provides enough bandwidth to handle multiple services. Optical fibres are readily available and are unaffected by the electromagnetic interference or radiation commonly emitted by mining equipment. For example, ROF is used to provide wireless-communication access to the $985-million Niagara Tunnel, a massive hydroelectricity project. However, there are many technical challenges. A typical underground communication system consists of three cascade channels: (1) the ROF link, (2) a special kind of coaxial cable called the ‘leaky feeder’, (3) the underground wireless channel. The ROF link is a nonlinear static system. RF amplifiers in multicarrier leaky feeder system create nonlinear distortion as well. Wireless channel exhibits very different propagation characteristics underground. The talk will address the design challenges and certain signal processing solutions for the underground communication systems.

Biography: Xavier Fernando is a Professor at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. He is an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer. He leads Ryerson Communications Lab. He has authored over 100 papers, a book on Radio over Fiber and holds two patents in this area.  He has been working in ROF systems for over a decade. He has delivered invited talks worldwide. He got the Canadian best paper award for his paper on ROF in 2001. His students have got several prizes including second prize at Sarnoff Symposium 2009 and first prize in IEEE Humanitarian Technology Workshop in 2014. He was a visiting scholar at the Institute of Advanced Telecommunications (IAT), UK in 2008. He is a co-author of WEBOK, the Wireless Engineering Body of Knowledge used for standard text to the wireless IEEE COMSOC Wireless Communication Engineering Technology program (WCET).  He was the Chair of the IEEE Toronto Section and the General Chair of CCECE 2014. He is the General Chair of IEEE Toronto International Conference – Science and Technology for Humanity 2009 (http://toronto.ieee.ca/tic-sth2009/). He served Ryerson Board and COMSOC Education Boards. He was an ABET program evaluator. He has received number of big grants. Homepage: http://www.ee.ryerson.ca/~fernando